Galatians
Introduction
Introduction

The division of this letter is simple:

1. Galatians 1:1-5 | Introduction
2. Galatians 1:6-2:21 | The historical part

In this part Paul explains the source of the gospel he preached, his call and his relationship to the brothers in Jerusalem and to Peter.

3. Gal 3:1-4:311You foolish Galatians, who has bewitched you, before whose eyes Jesus Christ was publicly portrayed [as] crucified?2This is the only thing I want to find out from you: did you receive the Spirit by the works of the Law, or by hearing with faith?3Are you so foolish? Having begun by the Spirit, are you now being perfected by the flesh?4Did you suffer so many things in vain—if indeed it was in vain? | The doctrinal part

In this part he explains the difference between justification through faith and justification through the law; he also clarifies the meaning of the law.

4. Gal 5:1-6:101It was for freedom that Christ set us free; therefore keep standing firm and do not be subject again to a yoke of slavery.2Behold I, Paul, say to you that if you receive circumcision, Christ will be of no benefit to you.3And I testify again to every man who receives circumcision, that he is under obligation to keep the whole Law.4You have been severed from Christ, you who are seeking to be justified by law; you have fallen from grace.5For we through the Spirit, by faith, are waiting for the hope of righteousness.6For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision means anything, but faith working through love. | The practical part

This part is about the characteristics of the new life and how that becomes visible in the daily life of the believer.

5. Gal 6:11-1811See with what large letters I am writing to you with my own hand.12Those who desire to make a good showing in the flesh try to compel you to be circumcised, simply so that they will not be persecuted for the cross of Christ.13For those who are circumcised do not even keep the Law themselves, but they desire to have you circumcised so that they may boast in your flesh.14But may it never be that I would boast, except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.15For neither is circumcision anything, nor uncircumcision, but a new creation.16And those who will walk by this rule, peace and mercy [be] upon them, and upon the Israel of God.17From now on let no one cause trouble for me, for I bear on my body the brand-marks of Jesus.18The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit, brethren. Amen. | Epilogue

The letter to the Galatians is a unique letter in several ways. For instance it is the only letter which is written to a group of churches. It is not exactly clear if these churches were in North-Galatia or in South-Galatia. To me, it seems most likely that these churches were in South-Galatia because there were a number of well-known cities such as Antioch, Iconia, Lystra and Derbe. You can read about these cities in the Acts 13 and 14. Paul had been there preaching the gospel.

The letter is also unique because of the cool tone and the powerful language Paul uses. After a short, necessary introduction he starts directly to denounce the evil for which the Galatians had opened their minds. In other letters he always starts with a word of appreciation for the good that was present; only after that he starts writing about the wrong. He doesn’t do that with the Galatians but cuts straight to the point. He’s in a rush. That has to do with the reason of his writing. What was going on?

In the churches in Galatia people had come who said that the believers should be circumcised and that they had to keep the law. These people also said that Paul was not a real apostle. The serious point was not that these people were there. Such people have always been there and they still exist today. But the worst part is that their false message was accepted by the Galatian believers. It is a serious matter that such people, with such a false message, still find their way into the church today. That’s why this letter is still very relevant, even today. Perhaps you're not yet aware of the depravity of this doctrine that these people bring. Even the Galatians weren’t. But the further we get into our examination of this letter the clearer it will be for you.

A good way to help you understand Paul’s attitude, is a comparison between this letter to the Galatians and two of the previous letters he wrote. I refer to the letter to the Romans and the first letter to the Corinthians. I assume that you have already studied these letters a little. So it will sound familiar to you if I say that Paul in his letter to the Romans, so the believers in Rome, wrote about the gospel as the only possible way for a sinner to be justified before God. The sinner is justified through faith.

In the letter to the Galatians Paul also writes about justification through faith. The difference is that he writes this letter to believers who were inclined to rob this tremendous truth of its power and blessing by introducing again the law in their lives. Whoever does this, affects the perfection of the work of Christ. In an impassioned plea Paul writes in this letter a crystal clear defense of being justified through faith alone, without works of law. He demonstrates in an unquestionable way how faith and law exclude each other completely as the means to be justified before God. Therefore the letter to the Galatians is a very impressive and essential complement to the letter to the Romans.

If we compare the letter to the Galatians with the one that is written to the Corinthians, something else will become clear. The church in Corinth was not what you would call a model church. Okay, it was an example, but one as a church should not be. In his letter to them Paul needed to mention many cases that were unacceptable and he had to exhort them about it. They even tolerated a sin you couldn’t even find among the Gentiles. Still Paul wasn’t as sharp in that letter as he is in the one he wrote to the Galatians.

In Corinth the mistake was mainly in the behavior of the Corinthians. They lived very carelessly; they had not yet judged all their heathen practices. Their thoughts about a practical Christian life were not sufficiently formed by the knowledge of God’s thoughts. In his letter to them Paul does his utmost to correct this. Their sinful practice was totally unacceptable, but you still find that Paul is willing to give them time to change these things. He even starts his letter with blessings and thanksgiving.

For the Galatians he has a very short blessing and not even a thanksgiving. The reason is that the Galatians had opened their minds to another gospel than the gospel of Christ that he had preached to them and that they had accepted. This other gospel was a mixture of faith and keeping the law and it meant a flagrant violation of the perfect work of Christ. Christ and His work were at stake. That’s why he uses such a cool tone in this letter and he lets them hear the powerful protest.

We are much more quickly convinced of the wrong practices found with the Corinthians, than we are of the wrong doctrine that found acceptance with the Galatians. Paul wasn’t. We may be thankful to God that He led His servant Paul to write this letter. Because of this, we are able today to judge the evil for its true content and deal with it in the way God wants.

Now read chapters 1 and 2.

Reflection: Why did Paul speak so severely against the Galatians?


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